Month: November 2013

“A Body of Water” looks at a body of memory

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“A Body of Water” looks at a body of memory. This is a link to a review of A Body of Water from 2005.

Who Are We?
Who Are We?

Ken Bronstein, Nancy Beaudry and Carly Hansen Prince in Lee Blessing’s A Body of Water at The Majestic Reader’s Theater tonight November 24th.

Body of Water Cast
Body of Water Cast
Carly Hansen Prince
Carly Hansen Prince
Ken Bronstein
Ken Bronstein
Nancy Beaudry
Nancy Beaudry
Waking Up in a Strange House
Waking Up in a Strange House

Lee Blessing’s Oregon Connection

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Reed College graduate, Lee Blessing discusses his play, A Body of Water.

Playwright Lee Blessing ’71 talks about social amnesia, the amorality of the eye, and his new play, A Body of Water
Playwright Lee Blessing ’71 talks about social amnesia, the amorality of the eye, and his new play, A Body of Water

A Body of Water by Lee Blessing tickets on sale now

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A Body of Water

A middle-aged couple wakes up every day having no recollection of who or where they are. Drawing on reason, deduction, physical clues, and the occasional memory flash, they try valiantly to piece together a story that would explain why they, current strangers to themselves and to each other, would wake up naked in the same bed with no idea of how they got there or, in fact, of anything that transpired before that morning. Their attempts are alternately funny and touching.

 

Lee Blessing begs one to consider who they are within the context of any particular moment with no past or future plans to help define who they are. The reader’s theatre production of A Body of Water is directed by Leigh Matthews Bock and features Carley Hansen-Prince, Nancy Beaudry, and Ken Bronstein. 

Tickets are now on sale for the November 24th 7pm performance  – $8/$6 – Please remember that seating is limited.
www.majestic.org/tickets

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An Aural Tradition

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The Broadway production, which first played at London's Globe Theatre, is done in the Elizabethan tradition, with an all-male cast.
Mark Rylance as Olivia (right) and Samuel Barnett as Viola in Twelfth Night. The Broadway production, which first played at London’s Globe Theatre, is done in the Elizabethan tradition, with an all-male cast.

On the November 10, 2013 edition of NPR‘s Weekend Edition, Tony Award-winning actor Mark Rylance, an actor from London based Shakespeare Globe Theatre talks about the aural tradition of theater.

Rylance says since there is virtually no scenery onstage at the Globe, the audience needs to listen very closely to Shakespeare’s language to know where they are and who they’re with.

In Shakespeare’s day, people said they went ‘to hear’ the plays,” he says. “No one wrote ‘I saw Julius Caesar. Or I saw whatever.’ They always say, ‘I heard, or I’m going to hear this play, or I went to hear.’ It was an aural tradition.”

Rylance says this aural tradition actively engages the audience.

“The story is very clearly happening in the audience’s imagination, not happening onstage,” he explains. “We’re prompting it with words and movements and things, but it’s all happening in their imagination. So, there’s a general spirit of playing with an audience, rather than for them or at them or to them.”

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