Month: September 2013

proof at The Majestic in Less Than 2 Hours

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Come join us with your friends on this blustery evening.

Is The Work Here?
Is The Work Here?

Listen to an interview by Storm Kennedy of KUGN NewsTalk Radio with Jodi Altendorf here.

I Wrote It.
I Wrote It.

 

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proof Tonight at The Majestic Theater

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Get your ticket’s now for tonight’s staged reader’s theater production of proof by David Auburn.

Click below to be taken to the Majestic ticket website.

Purchase Tickets

Catherine (Jodi Altendorf) and Hal (Bill Fech)
Catherine (Jodi Altendorf) and Hal (Bill Fech)

Season Tickets are available at the Majestic Theater box office for $72.

Will there be wine and beer for sale at intermission?

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Wine and Beer
Wine and Beer

Yes!  Bring a few extra dollars to treat yourself and a friend.

Also – did you know you can volunteer at The Majestic to help sell concessions?

Click here to find out how.

 

Do I have to wear a tuxedo to attend?

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Got the Look
Got the Look

The short answer is, “No.” Unless you’re trying to catch the eye of that special someone  you can wear casual attire. Click here to link to an article about theater etiquette that should answer most of your questions.

Why should I care about contemporary plays?

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Click here to hear Ed Herendeen founder and producing director of Contemporary American Theater in Festival Shepherdstown, West Virginia talk about founding and sustaining a theater festival committed to supporting bold, daring new works for the stage.

– The National Endowment for the Arts is the original source of this information.

What Is RT? And How Do You Really Spell It? By Aaron Shepard Reprinted from the book Readers on Stage, Shepard Publications, 2004

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Day of Absence at Western Carolina University
Day of Absence at Western Carolina University

For more reader’s theater, visit Aaron Shepard’s RT Page.

Copyright © 1996, 2004 Aaron Shepard. May be freely copied and shared for any noncommercial purpose as long as no text is altered or omitted.


Reader’s theater is minimal theater in support of literature and reading. There are many styles of reader’s theater, but nearly all share these features:

  • Narration serves as the framework of dramatic presentation.
  • No full stage sets. If used at all, sets are simple and suggestive.
  • No full costumes. If used at all, costumes are partial and suggestive, or neutral and uniform.
  • No full memorization. Scripts are used openly in performance.

Reader’s theater was developed as an efficient and effective way to present literature in dramatic form. Today as well, most scripts are literary adaptations, though others are original dramatic works.

Popular first in colleges and universities, reader’s theater has now moved to earlier education, where it is seen as a key tool for creating interest and skill in reading. Young people love to do it, and they give it their all—more so because it’s a team effort, and they don’t want to let down their friends! Repeated readings bring fluency, and if a script is based on an available book, kids want to read that too. What’s more, reader’s theater is a relatively simple activity for the teacher, with no required setup other than making copies of scripts.

Reader’s theater has been found effective not only for language arts but for social studies as well. Performing stories based on another culture is one of the best ways for students to become interested in and familiar with that culture.

As to how to spell it, there’s no one right way, so take your pick! All the following have been used:

  • reader’s theater
  • readers’ theater
  • readers theater
  • reader’s theatre
  • readers’ theatre
  • readers theatre

That’s why it’s sometimes easier to call it RT!

Reader’s Theater? What is that?

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The Majestic Reader’s Theater Company begins its first full season Sunday night September 29th with the Pulitzer Prize winning drama Proof by David Auburn.  Reader’s Theater differs from other forms of theater because all actors carry scripts. They use their voice, facial expression and posture to convey emotion.  Some small props and sound effects are used but there is no set or backdrop. The imagination of the audience places the actors in a specific time and location.  The reader’s theater format gives Corvallis a chance to attend contemporary works of famous modern playwrights that would otherwise not be performed here.  All performances are one evening only on the last Sunday of the month.